alternative hem finish for the ICON coat (bag the bagged lining!)

ICON COAT

I never want you to feel scared of tackling a project like the Icon coat. I think every seamstress has it in them to do something like that! You just need a little confidence. BUT, if you’re scared of any parts of the Icon coat, I’m sure it is the bagged lining. So, if that is what is keeping you from sewing a coat, I’m offering an alternative method today!

ICON COAT

I made the girls pattern just slightly different than the women’s. The big difference is the hem. I wanted a really nice professional finish for the lining on the Icon coat, which is why I made it a bagged lining. But, the bagged lining method will give you a headache the first time you do it. Because you’ll probably read the instructions 50 times trying to figure it out. Hopefully my photographed tutorial post will help you get it faster than that. But, either way I wanted the Kennedy coat to have an alternate method so I opted to ditch the bagged lining for a quicker, simpler sew. But the hem/lining instructions are pretty much interchangeable. So if you want to make a Kennedy with a bagged lining, you can! And alternatively if you want to ditch the bagged lining on the Icon and use a simpler method, here it is!

When changing the Kennedy method to a bagged hem, you’ll have to add 1 inch to the bottom of your outer coat hem. That is the only adjustment you have to make to the pattern pieces. Then, just move forward using the bagged lining tutorial. The bagged lining will look like so:

bagged lining

To change the Icon from a bagged hem to a simple hem, simply trim 1 inch from the bottom of your outer coat hem. The instructions include trimming 1″ from the lining also, so you’ll have to do it for both the lining, facing and outer coat. Then you just pin the coat all the way around and sew at 3/8″. Clip seam allowances and turn. You will want to press the hem really well to make sure you can’t see the lining from the outside. This illustration shows the stitching lines that you will make. This is very simple! Use the 6″ opening in the lining side seam to turn the coat.

lining

 

ICON COAT

That’s it!

In case you need a visual, here is the difference between a bagged and not bagged lining:

bagged vs not bagged

 

bagged lining tutorial

bagged lining tutorial

Bagged lining are so nice! You will love this professional hem finish. This is also one of those techniques that might give you a headache at first but will be totally worth the satisfaction and boost in your sewing confidence afterwards. I simplified this tutorial a tiny bit and took tons of photos, so I’m hoping walking you through this process will make it easy and fun.

Let’s get started! I’m demonstrating this technique on the Kennedy coat just because it was easier to show you with a smaller garment. The pieces are the same as the Icon, but the proportions vary. The Kennedy pattern actually doesn’t called for a bagged lining (I wanted to give you a break) but you can add a bagged lining to any coat/jacket pattern that has a lining and I will talk more about that tomorrow. Tomorrow I will also show you the Kennedy hem method which is super easy and not bagged. (And one of these days I will actually release the Kennedy pattern! I’m sorry it is taking so long, I’m just doing finishing touches!)

Okay, let’s get started!

Bagged Lining Tutorial//

To prep your coat for a bagged lining, the outer coat should be finished with the collar basted on.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

You lining should be assembled as well, including front facings and sleeves. I scrounged for my lining, using little piece I had laying around, so the sleeves are rayon and the body is cotton. I didn’t have enough to make the horses run the same way so they are just running all over the place ;).

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Your lining will have 3 openings. 2 of those are at the bottom of the lining/front facing seam. Leave about 3″ open at the bottom of this seam.

The other opening will be in the lining side seam. Leave 6″ open for turning later.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Clip off 1″ from the bottom of the lining. Leave the facing for now.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial Simplified bagged lining tutorial

To sew the outer coat to the lining turn both inside out and place right sides together. Flip the collar DOWN so it becomes encased in the seam. Now pin the fronts and necklines together, matching the shoulder seams at the neckline. Pin well and stitch around these three edges.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Start and stop 1″ from the bottom of where the facing meets the front coat.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Now we are going to baste the hem of the outer coat. Fold up 1″ and pin.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Here is a view of the other side. The coat hem is flipped up 1″ and pinned all the way across the hem. Leave the facing and lining alone for now.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Beginning 3″ from the front, stitch hem in place at 1/4″ from fold with a baste stitch.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Here is a view of the outer hem (folded and basted, the facing (still long) and the lining (trimmed 1″). I think the most confusing part of this process is keeping track of all the different pieces and lengths, so hopefully this photo will give you a good checkpoint.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Now lay coat flat. We are focusing on the facing and outer hem right now. Clip the outer hem right where it lines up with the facing.

 

 

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

The clip should go 7/8″ and butt up against the stitching you just made at the hem fold.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Now stitch from the corner to the edge of the hem.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

 

Clip the excess fabric.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

 

Pull the lining out from under the coat like so:

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

 

Now match lining with hem with right sides together.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Pin all the way across.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

View from the other side:

Simplified bagged lining tutorial Simplified bagged lining tutorial

 

Now stitch all the way across them hem at 3/8″.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Trim all the corners of your coat and flip it rightside out through the hole in your lining.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Remove baste stitches at hem. Give your hem a good press, focusing on this corner.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Now you’ll need a needle and thread for finishing. Fold under the facing, catching the little bit of lining underneath.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Slip stitch this section closed.

Simplified bagged lining tutorial

Once you’ve done that you have three options to finalize the hem.

1) Press really well

2) Topstitch bottom edge of coat with matching thread.

3) Finish hem with hand stitching.

Your choice may depend on the type of fabric you are using and how you like the way the hem looks. I prefer to have the hem pressed well without topstitching or using a hand stitch to keep the hem flat. It is up to you though!

And you’re done! Not that bad, huh? Now you can admire your bagged lining!

bagged lining tutorial

sewing 101// welt pocket tutorial

WELT POCKET TUTORIAL

We’re on Day 3 of the Icon Coat Sewalong! If you missed the first few days, check out this post about fabric selection and this post featuring a powder blue icon coat on a plus size model.

 

One of my favorite features of the Icon coat (And the Kennedy, too!) is the welt pockets. Welt pockets are so cozy and inviting on cold winter days! And they look slick also! If you’ve never done a welt pocket, you may be intimidated. And if you have done them before, I hope you’re just excited!

These pockets aren’t really hard to do, but the first one you do does require that you pay attention to all the little details so you get it right. I promise this is a technique that will have you high-fiving yourself when you’re done because it is so satisfying! It looks great and creates a professional, functional pocket. You’ll love welt pockets when you are done, I just know it!

Today I’m sharing photos to help you figure this welt pocket thing out. If you’ve never sewn a welt pocket before, I recommend reading through these instructions a few times to get a good grasp of the process before diving in. Like I said before though, it’s not hard and you’ll be acing these in no time!

Welt Pocket Tutorial

The single welt pocket consists of the following pattern pieces:
-body of your coat (front piece in this case)
-the welt pocket facing, which is the same fabric as your coat
-interfacing
-welt pocket lining, any fabric (the shiny fabric in the photos)

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

 

 

I have a little trick for making welt pockets a breeze! Take an extra piece of paper and trace the welt pocket rectangle located on your welt pocket facing piece. Then cut it out.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Pin the paper on right where the pocket placement is on the facing and front piece. I mark my welt pocket placement using the thread method that I showed you last week.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Then sew around the edge of the paper. I usually snag the paper a little bit, too.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Pull the paper off and use it again for the other side.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Clip into the middle of the pocket opening and create a “Y” shape into the corners. Make sure you clip all the way into the corners but not past the thread. Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Trim the seam allowances. You don’t have to trim the triangles if you don’t want to.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Flip the facing into the inside of the coat and press well.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

The inside of the coat will look like this:

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Now fold up the facing to create the welt.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

There is a dashed line on the pattern piece to help you with this step. I drew the dashed line in this photo so you know where it goes.

welt-pocket-13

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Pin the welt to the seam allowance, but not to the front of the coat.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Now sew all the layers you just pinned (everything except the front piece) right over the little triangle seam allowance. Stitch right on top of the stitching that is already on this piece of fabric.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Repeat on the other side. This will adhere the short edges of the pocket to the coat. Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Here is a view of the pocket and the piece you just sewed, just to give you another view if you are lost.Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

The back will look like this when both sides are sewn up.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Place the pocket lining on top of the facing.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Pin the lining on top with right sides facing.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

And sew all around the edges.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Almost done! 3 sides of the welt pocket are closed leaving only the opening where you put your hands.

One more final touch is to stitch along the top of the seam allowance behind the opening of the welt pocket. This will make the pocket appear more structured and nice.

Lift up the outer edge of the coat.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

 

Pin the outer fabric out of the way. You will be sewing just the seam allowance, pocket facing and pocket lining in this step. Sew over the existing stitching like you did in the previous steps on the short edges.

Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

Give it a good press and there is your professional single welt pocket! Pretty snazzy, huh? Simple Welt Pocket Tutorial

SEWING 101// WELT POCKET TUTORIAL

STYLED // powder blue icon plus

 

the ICON coat pattern

Today I’m sharing these photos of another ICON coat! to inspire you as you sew-along! It’s nice to this coat on different people and I designed it to be warm and flattering for everyone! I think Cecilia is adorable in it! We styled this up with pleather leggings and booties for a nice fall/winter look. And Victory Rolls! I love it. These photos are from the same photoshoot as the Zippy Top Plus release photos, and we have more outfits coming! I’m just going to trickle them out over the next few weeks.

I picked out this powder blue wool because it reminded me of the sixties. It’s lined with a black cotton.

The back of the coat has the pleat at the top, but I didn’t bind the pleat down again on the bottom. So you have the option when you’re sewing your coat! It just changes the way the coat hangs a bit. I also omitted the sleeve bands, those are optional as well.

the ICON coat pattern the ICON coat pattern

ICON COAT +

the ICON coat

Tomorrow we’re talking welt pockets!

If you need more inspiration, check out the IT GIRL lookbook for a houndstooth coat, or the coat listing for my purple coat!

ICON COATALONG: fabric selection + other materials

icon coat-along

Welcome to the ICON COAT-ALONG! This week is all about the ICON. Today we are talking about fabric and the other supplies you’ll need to make this coat.

I designed the ICON coat for wool coating. I love wool coating, it’s fun to sew with and really nice and warm to wear! It’s thick without being too bulky and difficult to sew with. I just love it.

So I rounded up some sources for wool coating for you today. It can be tricky to track down, but it’s worth the effort! Other fabrics that you can use include boucle, tweed, suitings, melton, velvet and whipcord.

I felt like I hit the jackpot when I found this line from fabric.com. It’s called the Season Wool Collection and has 19 colors! 19!! I ordered the mustard wool and it is the perfect coat fabric. I’ll show you the Kennedy I made with it soon! I love it and now I want all the rest of these great colors! The olive and charcoal are blends, but the rest are 100% wool.

WOOL

 

1.Birdee Green
2. Wool Blend Melton Olive Fabric
3. Putty Fabric
4. Wool Melton Teal Fabric
5. Wool Melton Pumpkin Fabric
6. Wool Melton Mustard Fabric
7. Dark Charcoal Fabric
8. Wool Melton Cranberry Fabric
9. Melton Pink Blossom Fabric
10. Melton Antique Purple Fabric

While I was ordering, I peeked at the clearance stuff and found this patterned wool blend for only like $3 a yard! Such a steal and it’s really pretty in person. I made an ICON with it and I’ll show you that one tomorrow! I couldn’t find that one anymore, but there are some other deals here.

Mood.com is another great source for wool coating. It seems like most of their stuff is sold out right now though! I got my lavender wool that is on the cover of the ICON coat pattern from Mood.com. Here are a few more pretty fabrics!

WOOL COATING

1. Heathered Gray Solid Coating
2. Rose Beige Solid Coating
3. Dark Turquoise Solid Coating
4. Off-White Black Brown Herringbone Coating
5. Brick Solid Coating
6. Marc Jacobs Olive Solid Coating
3. Mixed Brown Solid Coating
4. Black Solid Coating

Boucle and Tweed are generally wool or blend fabrics that have a thicker, bumpy texture. Tweed is fairly popular and I see it in stores often, so you may be able to source some good fabric locally!

I browsed Joanns the other day looking for coat options and found plenty of choices in the apparel section. Also check out the Red Tag Clearance section, you never know what you’ll find there are they often have good apparel stuff.

 

For the lining:

I love a shiny rayon lining for the sleeves. It’s easy to slip on over a sweater or another layer of clothing. You can really use any fabric for the body lining, including fun quilting cottons, rayon, polyester. Try a flannel if you want the coat to be even warmer.

Other materials:

-You’ll also need 1/2 yard of midweight fusible interfacing. This will be used on the facing pieces to create a good base for buttonholes, the welt pocket facings to create a sturdier pocket, and the collar. The collar must stand up nice and crisp and interfacing will help it keep it’s shape. I always use Pellon midweight fusible for this, available at Joanns and other places.

-5 or 7 buttons. If you are making the shorter sleeve version of this coat you will only need 5 buttons. If you’re making long sleeves with the sleeve cuff band you will need 7 buttons. I love big buttons, about 1 1/4″ to 1 1/2″ are perfect for this coat. A few good online sources are etsy and Lots of Buttons.

 

See you tomorrow for more Icon fun!